Business Etiquette: 5 Rules That Matter Now

How many times have you sat in a meeting and everyone is looking at their computer or phone instead of the speaker?  Meetings would finish in half the time if everyone focused on the topic at hand during the meeting.  Not only is it a waste of time but it’s rude to everyone else in the room. 

The following excerpts from the Inc.com article, 5 Rules of Business Etiquette by Eliza Browning addresses this issue as well as several others. 

The word “etiquette” gets a bad rap. For one thing, it sounds stodgy and pretentious. And rules that are socially or morally prescribed seem intrusive to our sense of individuality and freedom.

But the concept of etiquette is still essential, especially now—and particularly in business. New communication platforms, like Facebook and Linked In, have blurred the lines of appropriateness and we’re all left wondering how to navigate unchartered social territory.

Boil it down and etiquette is really all about making people feel good. It’s not about rules or telling people what to do, or not to do, it’s about ensuring some basic social comforts.

1. Send a Thank You Note

The art of the thank you note should never die. If you have a job interview, or if you’re visiting clients or meeting new business partners—especially if you want the job, or the contract or deal—take the time to write a note. You’ll differentiate yourself by doing so and it will reflect well on your company too.

2. Know the Names

It’s just as important to know your peers or employees as it is to develop relationships with clients, vendors or management. Reach out to people in your company, regardless of their roles, and acknowledge what they do.

3. Observe the ‘Elevator Rule’

When meeting with clients or potential business partners off-site, don’t discuss your impressions of the meeting with your colleagues until the elevator has reached the bottom floor and you’re walking out of the building. That’s true even if you’re the only ones in the elevator.

4. Focus on the Face, Not the Screen

It’s hard not to be distracted these days. We have a plethora of devices to keep us occupied; emails and phone calls come through at all hours; and we all think we have to multitask to feel efficient and productive.

But that’s not true: When you’re in a meeting or listening to someone speak, turn off the phone. Don’t check your email. Pay attention and be present.

5. Don’t Judge

We all have our vices—and we all have room for improvement. One of the most important parts of modern-day etiquette is not to criticize others.

To read the full article go to http://www.inc.com/eliza-browning/business-etiquette-rules-that-matter-now.html

Okay, I just reread my rant at the beginning of the post and realize I broke rule number 5, don’t be judgemental.  Please forgive my rude behavior.

Do you have any business etiquette rules to add to these five?

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